Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12188/16764
Title: Early prognosis in patients with community-acquired severe sepsis and septic shock: analysis of 184 consecutive cases.
Authors: Grozdanovski, Krsto 
Milenkovikj, Zvonko 
Demiri, Ilir 
Spasovska, Katerina 
Cvetanovska, Marija 
Kirova-Urosevic, Valerija
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts
Journal: Prilozi (Makedonska akademija na naukite i umetnostite. Oddelenie za medicinski nauki) 
Abstract: Purpose: To determine the risk factors on hospital mortality in patients with community-acquired severe sepsis and septic shock in the first 24 hours after admission to the intensive care unit. Materials and methods: The study was prospective, observational, single-centre and included adult patients with community-acquired severe sepsis and septic shock. Demographics, clinical, laboratory and microbiological data were recorded. The main outcome measure was hospital mortality. Results: During the study period, 184 patients were included. The overall mortality rate was 51.6%, 44.4% with severe sepsis and 71.4% in patients with septic shock. The lung was the most common site of infection (65.8%) and respiratory failure was the most common organ failure (54.9%). Multivariate analysis identified four independent risk factors for mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: three or more organ dysfunctions (OR, 3.212; 95% CI, 1.585-6.506; p<0.001), acute respiratory failure (OR, 2.649 95% CI, 1.327-5.287; p=0.006), positive blood culture (OR, 2.708; 95% CI, 1.289-5.689; p=0.009) and chronic heart failure (OR, 2.112; 95% CI, 1.036-4.308; p=0.040). Conclusion: Our results highlight the importance of three or more organ dys-functions, acute respiratory failure, positive blood culture and chronic heart failure as independent risk factors for mortality in the first 24 hours after admission in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. This will benefit the early identification of patients at high risk for poor outcomes that contributes to intensive management and appropriate treatment interventions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12188/16764
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine: Journal Articles

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